Monday, October 17, 2016

Former Lincoln Park Hoops Star Killed In Uptown

“He wasn't no thug, no gangbanger, yet he met the fate of so many other folks in Chicago... And for what?”

So go the memories of friends, family, and fans of Gregory Dion Tucker Jr, a former Lincoln Park High School basketball star who was shot to death last night as he drove in Uptown.

Two city sources identified Tucker as last night's victim and family members are now confirming the death.

Tucker attended Whitney Young Magnet School before graduating from LPHS in 2010. From there, he played hoops at North Dakota State College of Science before returning to Chicago to study criminal justice.

He turned 25 last month.

“If you knew Greg, you knew he was a genuine guy, always could make you laugh, and just had a love for the game and family was everything,” friend John Kinsler said.

“He just had a baby girl and he was so proud and excited! He wasn't in a gang. He WASN'T in a gang. HE WASN'T IN A GANG!” one friend wrote on Facebook this morning.

"Greg's death is tragic and unsettling for so many reasons. Not only because he left behind a loving family and an infant daughter," Daniel Poneman said on Facebook this afternoon, "But because the way in which he died truly shows us that it could happen to anybody, at any time, in any part of Chicago. This isn't just a west side problem, this isn't just a south side problem, this isn't just a gang problem, this is a Chicago problem, an America problem, a human problem - that affects all of us."

Chicago police records show that Tucker was arrested on October 9 for a warrant related to a domestic battery case in suburban Cook County.

Images: Facebook
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20 comments:

  1. To the liberals it's no big deal unless a cop shot him. That needs to change.

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  2. "This isn't just a west side problem, this isn't just a south side problem, this isn't just a gang problem, this is a Chicago problem, an America problem, a human problem - that affects all of us."

    It's actually a political problem. But too many people are brainwashed into thinking a particular political party that has been in power for too long in too many U.S. cities will save them--when it's the one political party filling the streets with illegal guns, drugs, and spreading poverty.

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    1. It IS mostly a West Side and South Side problem. Uptown is an exception, one of the few communities on the North Side where gang violence and ghetto behavior is common. North Rogers Park is another.

      It's a cultural problem more than a political one. A culture that devalues education, delayed gratification and professional careers in favor of thugging, dealing, teenage pregnancy, and over-reliance on government to fund their lives and cover up for their stupid mistakes.

      I'm glad that lately I've been reading more about programs designed to get people jobs instead of provide them with vague "self-esteem building" activities like selling Streetwise, specifically targeting criminals fresh out of jail who are those most likely to go back to crime.

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    2. "I'm glad that lately I've been reading more about programs designed to get people jobs instead of provide them with vague "self-esteem building" activities like selling Streetwise..."

      Except that by selling StreetWise one *earns* self - esteem by getting out there and actually selling a quality product (StreetWise magazine), it's hardly a "vague 'self-esteem' building" activity. Success as a StreetWise vendor is measured strictly by how much money one can eventually put in one's pocket. That's just about the best "program(s) designed to get people jobs" around, selling StreetWise is "a hand up, NOT a hand-out", the vendors have to get out there and earn their $$$ themselves...

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  3. He may not have been in a gang, but was the shooter? That's the issue.

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  4. The ironic thing is he was probably shot by another black man simply because of the color of his skin. A gang banger saw him and probably assumed that since he was black he must be in a gang and since the shooter knew the victim wasn't in HIS gang, he shot him assuming he was in a rival gang, again, because of the color of his skin.

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    1. Well spoken my brother.

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    2. Oh my god!!! Yes, this!!! Brilliant!!! This needs to be shared EVERYWHERE!!!

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    3. This scenario crossed my mind.

      About two years back I was stopped at the light at Larrabee / Clybourn when an older model green Ford SUV pulled up behind me. I saw one head look out the driver window, really staring my car down. Followed by 3 other passenger heads looking out. They sped over to the right side of my car. My front windows were open, it was a nice day. I heard someone shout "nah, she white". A guy in the back lifted up something that caught the light (metallic looking), laughed, and they sped off quickly through the red light. The whole thing happened fast enough that I'm more shaken when I look back. A week later, I saw a brief news story (I think on DNAinfo?) about a car getting shot up in that area. Same make/model/color as my own. Needless to say, I have not taken that route since, and when I do drive, this is always in the back of my mind.

      My point is, at least they took two seconds to check me out. I often wonder if I had been an innocent black man or woman, would they have just started shooting??

      Whatever the cause of this, I do wish the very best for this man's family, especially for his child's future.

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  5. There is more to this story than just skin color. I am not trying bad mouth the guy, but I live in uptown and I am familiar with the neighborhood thugs that are causing the majority of the problems here. Unfortunately his friends list on Facebook includes some of these individuals.

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    1. Shocking. Just shocking.

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    2. Just because he had facebook friends who were thugs doesn't mean he ever engaged in any criminal activity himself. I would think you would be hard pressed to find a black kid who grew up in the city who didn't know some people at the facebook friend level who were involved with gangs and crime, that doesn't mean they are all thugs.

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  6. How is someone arrested for domestic battery a great guy?

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    1. Realistically, being arrested is only an allegation...

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  7. He was a great guy.

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  8. It is both political and cultural. It's interesting to me that Crains just published an article that tells us more than 50% of the population of Illinois would leave if they could. Chicago was higher.
    Yet if it's more than 50%, why allow the same crooked politicians to hold office year after year after year? I don't know a person who plans on staying in Illinois in the next few years. That tells us that no one even thinks the state or city can be saved. So sad - there are still so many good people living here.

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  9. If you do not know him or the (past) circumstances he was in.. Don't lend an opinion on his character or how he met his fate; assuming makes an ass out of you.

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  10. Do you understand how easily you can get arrested for domestic violence. Dont sit here and say at worst a mistake in which you nor I know the facts make him a bad guy. Guy loved to play hoops heck of a young man humble kid and he loved that kid.It erroneous to say I'm not trying to bad mouth him but I'm going to tell you he had friends on Facebook etc. This young guy saw good in people and got along with people. We all have friends siblings who are less than stellar and we still don't just discard them.

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    1. At age 25, he needed to find something to do other than play basketball.

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