Friday, September 04, 2015

YES, REALLY: For Slamming Woman's Face Into Garage Floor During Robbery, Felon Gets Probation

A 29-year-old man who was accused of slamming a Wrigleyville woman’s head into the concrete floor of her garage during an attempted robbery last October has received a sentence of five years probation in exchange for pleading guilty to one count of aggravated battery.

Prosecutors said Ozzie Scott, who was on parole for armed robbery and aggravated battery to a police officer at the time of the attack, followed the woman into her garage in the 3300 block of Sheffield as she headed to work on the morning of October 10, 2014, and attacked her in her car.

Police who responded to a neighbor’s call of a woman screaming for help found the 25-year-old victim on the floor of her garage with a bloody face and a broken eye socket. Scott was still on-scene.

Scott, who had been released on parole just two months before the incident, was returned to prison shortly after being charged in the Wrigleyville attack. He’s now scheduled to be paroled (again) on April 8, 2018.

Image: Scott's intake photo from the Illinois Department of Corrections
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24 comments:

  1. 5 years probation (not incarcerated), or is he incarcerated until parole in April/2018?

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    1. Five years probation for this crime. He will be in prison until April 2018 on his previous robbery conviction, for which parole was revoked.

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  2. The person at my health club who handles memberships told me the other day that an unusually large number of members are moving out of Chicago because of the crime. She said many of the members have moved to Denver.

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  3. Someone did that to me I would be sitting and waiting for him when he got out.

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  4. Parole is (essentially) a stricter version of probation - you can be returned to jail if you violate the terms.
    And for us citizens, parole didn't work in the case of Mr Scott.
    So, sure...let's try a less strict version of parole.
    Makes sense, right?

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  5. WTF! Probation? He is clearly a dangerous piece is shit violent criminal. I feel so sorry for the victim who was brutally attacked and then saw he attacker get no time the crime he committed against her.

    Why not send him back to jail for the parole violation and tack on another 5 to 10 years for the new crime?

    Oh I know. Because we have prosecutors and judges that care more about violent criminals than victims. If he did this in any other county in Illinois he'd be in jail for the next 10 years.

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    1. Slamming a woman's head to the ground sounds more like attempted murder to me. Disgusting pieces of filth. Both the perp and the judge.

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  6. Name of the judge please? Why not run the judge's picture alongside that of the felon.

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    1. Here is some more info on this judge from the Chicago Tribune on her retention vote in 2008:

      We urge a "no" vote on these judges:

      *Evelyn Clay: Take your pick. The Chicago Council of Lawyers says Clay is indecisive, "weak on the law" and can't always control her courtroom. The Chicago Bar Association rapped her for making "insensitive comments from the bench."

      Fast forward to 2015 and she is the Supervising Judge in the Criminal Division.

      So you have an incompetent fool, making almost $200,000 a year, that has been repeatedly retained by foolish low information voters and let's violent criminals like this off with no time for the crimes they commit. We're doomed.

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    2. Thank you for posting this.
      There may be a NICE opportunity here.
      Where we (via) CWB find a pattern of baffling / lenient sentencing like this, and it impacts our community -- let it be known that we will actively recruit and actively support ($$$) an opposition candidate.
      Pick the worst three or the worst five.
      But let it be known that we will be active.
      CWB - care to comment? Any interest in creating some sort of running judicial malfeasance scorecard as part of this site?

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    3. We will post judge summaries when it's time for retention votes.

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  7. If Tunney and the Captain of Police (Looney) had their way, she needed to hire private security to get her to her garage on the way to work since we do not have the police we use to. According to them "we all have to step up".

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  8. I remember this crime because I live just 3 blocks to the east of this woman. What a terrifying crime --- you are getting into your car to go to work one morning and you are brutally attacked by a large man who bashes your head into the concrete floor. This is the kind of crime that turns a city person into a suburbanite.

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    1. This is the case that made my wife and I accelerate the listing of our condo, and now our family (with two small kids) are enjoying the peace, quiet and safety of the burbs. Let's not forget that there was some insinuation of a sexual attack in this case as well but the prosecutors didn't think it was strong enough to tack on. I would rather let 100 drug offenders out of prison than give this human piece of shit probation.

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  9. Wait until we start getting the next tax bills. The rate in Chicago has been raised to the highest in the history of the city. Watch the for sale signs to go up.

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    1. Sign is already up mate. Next stop - Hua Hin, Thailand. Golfing and girls.

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  10. Dear CWB,
    I am wondering if we can petition the judge in this case, or in a future case that has not yet appeared before the judge to increase the punishment. If we could get say 200 signatures on a petition asking the judge to hand out the maximum sentence, I wonder if that would work. I know that in Lakeview, the local parents pressured the city to improve the Nettlehorst school on Broadway and it changed from a crappy school to a destination school. Does this kind of community pressure work on judges too?

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  11. How do we get a "3 felony strikes your out" constitutional ballot going? Only exception would be if crime involved use of a gun--then it is one strike.

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  12. Am I just being paranoid, or do we now have a government that approves harm done to us? Where is this leading?

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  13. Time out: The offender effectively received a 3.5 year sentence for the crime - which admittedly doesn't seem like a lot - but it is not just 5 years of probation. If he violates his future probation, which we can all bet that he will, he gets more prison time.

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    1. No, he's just working off the time he was given for the previous convictions.

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    2. Sept 6 - 1:51
      Please see the full text of the (I thought quite clear) article above.
      The lovely Mr Scott was two months...as in eight weeks....out on parole. And for what? A $10 sack of weed? Not exactly. He was "on parole for armed robbery and aggravated battery to a police officer"
      Not to get too technical here but, he violated his parole. So he gets to finish what he started - his original sentence.
      Let's not forget that this 'violation' involved robbery, breaking a woman's eye socket, may have been an interrupted sexual assault, and is only part of a long rap sheet.
      So no, 3.5 years doesn't seem like much. Except that you and I are paying for it. In that way it does seem 'expensive'.

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