Sunday, May 10, 2015

UNDER PRESSURE: Local Robbery Rate Nears Record Low

Robbery reports in Wrigleyville and Boystown continued to decline sharply in April, with just six incidents reported last month compared to nine in April 2014.

Even better, the year-to-date robbery count through April is the second-lowest on record, with a total of 22 cases logged. That compares to 29 through April of last year.

But before local politicians and CAPS officers were called out on their false narrative about crime being “down,” our neighborhood streets were downright dangerous as 2011, 2012, and 2013 recorded three consecutive record high robbery counts.

This year’s 22 robberies to date pales in comparison to the whopping 52 recorded through April in 2013 and 2012. Fifty robberies were reported as of April 30, 2011.

Citizens took a stand in the summer of 2013 and refused to accept the city’s false public statements. CAPS meetings became—how should we put this?—colorful. The police commander at the time, Elias Voulgaris, stopped citing department statistics, saying nobody believed them anyway.

While our district continued to lose officers in large numbers, Voulgaris ensured that all incoming officers went to the night shift when street crime was running wild. Anti-robbery tactics have paid dividends and we are on the cusp of having our neighborhood back.

Voulgaris transferred out of our district in April. Will progress continue to be made under the new commander or will the night time streets get short shrift? How will the new commander attack Uptown's record-setting homicide pace while protecting three nightlife districts and a Major League Baseball stadium with 27% fewer cops than the district had just three years ago?

Time will tell. But, if this weekend is any indication—nearly half of the district did not have police assigned for patrol late Saturday into Sunday—our celebration may be short-lived.

Note: For statistical purposes, CWB considers the area of Chicago Police Department beats 1923, 1924, and 1925—including all crimes on the outside border streets of Irving Park, Southport, and Belmont—to be "Wrigleyville and Boystown." Statistics are taken directly from the city's publicly-available data portal.
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20 comments:

  1. Well, here's the problem to ponder. Wrigleyville got so much police coverage on the midnight shift that the other shifts, when the gang violence occurs in Uptown got stripped. So now you have a decline in robbery but a big spike in shootings and murders. You can't robe Peter to pay Paul. Maybe if the police had more manpower, a common idea from everyone, both areas could be properly policed and we would see a decline in crime.

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    1. You are correct. The district does not have enough manpower to handle two problems at once. We've called it "whack-a-mole." Murders pop up in Uptown, then get smacked down, allowing robberies to pop up in Boystown. Then, those get smacked down and burglaries pop up in North Center. Etc.

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  2. Don't worry election is over and this summer it will be off the charts. Not to mention all the cop hating going around this country by certain politicians and community leaders.

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  3. Same old game just different players (commanders). Everyone of them gets shifted around or promoted for their screw ups.

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  4. May I suggest comparing our neighborhood's numbers with the figures for Chicago as a whole. (W-B on the left vertical axis, total Chicago on the right.)
    Without getting in to all of the statistical BS in the 'crime is down' narrative, last time I checked the metro numbers were down more than the W-B numbers.

    ....whatever the case it's damn absurd that the majority of our neighborhood is left without police coverage late at night. WAY out of line. No excuse at all for this!

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    1. Take a look here. http://www.cwbchicago.com/2015/01/now-hard-part-area-robberies-down-34.html

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    2. That (terrific) work is exactly why I posted the question.
      Our robbery rate spiked hugely mid 2006 through mid 2012. All the while robberies declined in the rest city.
      Us: Robberies UP 40+%
      Chicago total: Robberies DOWN 40+%
      The recent 'success' comes after a very long history of failure (as you showed).
      We should be way way below where we are today.
      The question is - how much is 'way' below, now?
      Thanks again for your good work.

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  5. http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/June-2015/Chicago-crime-stats/

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    1. Thank you for this posting. It's like reading about city hall and the police department heads during the Capone era.

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  6. I though that the crime report numbers are down because of lack of officers, resulting in skewed statistics? Why are these statistics now being cited as accurate?

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    1. Realizing that there's a 99.9% chance that you are trolling, we'll answer.

      This story speaks of one and only one type of crime (robberies) in a very specific area (beats 1923, 1924, 1925), where reports of that crime and police responses to reports of that crime are monitored 24/7 by a non-CPD entity (us). We post robberies as we become aware of them and then ensure that the robberies appear in the city's Data Portal. If a robbery does not appear, we find out why.

      This practice led to the discovery of one "missing" robbery in particular.

      http://www.cwbchicago.com/2015/02/this-is-awkward-robbery-of-mayors-son.html

      To date this year, no incidents that we learned of independently have gone missing.

      For over two years, we have logged, tracked, and cross-checked robbery reports in this area. When police do not respond or police responses are delayed to the point that a report is not filed, we include that information on our site and catalog it here:

      http://www.cwbchicago.com/p/unofficial-roberies-2014.html

      Since the overnight shift of the 19th district was replenished with officers, the number of non-responses and responses delayed to the point of victim abandonment have declined sharply.

      In previous years, we found and reported on a significant number of robberies that were downgraded to lesser crimes. This year, we are aware of only 2 such cases.

      So, cutting to the chase, our independently-compiled information for one specific crime (robberies) in this specific area, during this specific year is inline with the city's posted information about the same crime in the same area within the same time with a variance of 2 reclassified crimes.

      With the exception of homicides, no other crime category is watched and analyzed as closely by non-city entities as robberies are in our neighborhood.

      Burglaries continue to be downgraded to "theft from building" in large numbers. Attempted burglaries are downgraded to "criminal damage" regularly. Actual burglaries are kicked down to trespassing. And many other lesser crimes go unrecorded due to non-response, delayed response, or CPD's aggravating report-over-the-phone system.

      So, there you go.

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    2. I wasn't trolling. Honest question, good response. I have become numb to crime statistics after the Chicago Mag article and reading your blog.

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    3. That .1% is why we don't gamble. Thank you for being a part of CWB. Much appreciated.

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    4. Yes, CWB. Excellent response as I have wondered the exact same question posed by the non-troller. I felt the question was legit. Thanks again for the question and the detailed answer. We depend on you for the truth!

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    5. Thank you for supporting us over the past couple of years. We promise to tell it like it is.

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  7. Do they count the robberies when victims fail to show up in court or otherwise refuse to cooperate with police and no charges are filed? From reading CWB, that seems to be the norm for people who are robbed in the area. So perhaps the robbery rate is at least twice what the stats show.

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    1. What happens in court is independent of police statistics.

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  8. Spin being closed helped. It's reopening this week as The Den/Manhole. Wonder what kind of Den it will be? That bar attracts a lot of crap to the Helmont area.

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    1. Not sure about The Den, but Manhole is going to be a male-only playspace, kind of like the back area at Manhandler or The Hole at Jackhammer. I'm not happy about the location. I won't venture that close to Hellmont at night. I predict neither business will survive. Thanks, THUGS, for ruining everything including OUR neighborhood.

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  9. Is Spin the first bar victim from what has been going on the past few years ?

    I thought their Midnight shower shows 10 - 15 years ago were fun, and it was safe outside then.
    I also remember when Hydrate was the sleezy, smokey Manhole.

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