Tuesday, March 24, 2015

REMARKABLE: City Council Considers Two Laws That Could Make A Difference

Two newly-proposed city ordinances are worth keeping an eye on:

Tavern Closure Authority

Mayor Rahm Emanuel and River North Alderman Brendan Reilly have introduced legislation that would make it easier for the city to close bars and taverns that create problems for police. The ordinance was introduced last week after a double-homicide outside of a long-troubled bar in Bucktown.

If (and it’s a big if) the law passes, the city will be authorized to immediately close any bar or tavern after certain serious crimes are reported:
Illegal discharge of a firearm, aggravated assault or battery, criminal sexual assault on the premises or on adjacent property would trigger immediate and indefinite closure of an establishment, according to the ordinance…
The city would be required to hold a hearing on the “summary closure” within five business days. Shuttered businesses would not be allowed to re-open until they provide an approved “plan of action” to address safety concerns or win an appeal through the city’s license disciplinary process.
Under those guidelines, at least one Wrigleyville bar would have been closed after the St. Patrick’s weekend debacle following an alleged aggravated assault with a knife on its dance floor.

CWB’s review of city crime records found that thirteen reported crimes that would qualify for “summary closure” have been reported in Wrigleyville and Boystown bars since January 1, 2014.
• The previously-mentioned alleged aggravated assault with a knife in Wrigleyville.
• Nine aggravated batteries, including one stabbing and one against a police officer. Six of those took place in Boystown, the other three were in Wrigleyville.
• Three criminal sexual assaults—one in Boystown and two in Wrigleyville.
Local alderman Tom Tunney has not made his position on the proposal known. State records show that six of his ten largest campaign contributors are involved in the liquor industry.

Catalytic Converter Sales

Another proposed ordinance aims to make the theft of vehicle catalytic converters less appealing:
The ordinance, introduced by Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Ald. Marty Quinn (13th), prohibits secondhand dealers, junk peddlers and pawn shops from buying and selling catalytic converters.
The measure would also provide clear guidelines to repair shops and recycling facilities in terms of who they can accept converters from and how to dispose of them.
Victims of these crimes are usually on the hook for the repairs, which cost an average of $750.
----------
Email us.  Facebook us. Twitter us.

15 comments:

  1. Unfortunately, Alderman Tunney doesn't have to care if his position on this ordinance is liked by his constituents because he has a guaranteed 4 more years of $100k+ annual salary to content himself with. Granted, obviously, enough of his constituents are happy (lazy like him) with his performance to allow him to be re-elected. Personally, I'm sorry that happened, but Tunney doesn't have to care ONE IOTA about what anyone except the Mayor thinks for at least the next 3.5 years.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm still awaiting, dating back seven months, responses to three professionally worded emails on various issues, as well as four professionally placed telephone calls. Seven months! What some arrogant carte blanche attitude this "alderman" has! No, he doesn't care, and he won't care, for 3.5+ years. He is taking all of the taxpaying residents of Ward 44 for a fucking ride.

      Delete
    2. It's the residents of Ward 44 that are giving him the free ride....for some reason, people don't seem to have a clue that if they vote for him or not vote at all, he'll remain in office and won't need to give a shit about us because we don't care about us by voting for insanity over and over again. Enjoy him!

      Delete
    3. A long time ago, early 2000's. there was actually a moratorium on new bars in Wrigleyville. When it was lifted the bars came in like locusts and drove out small restaurants and shops. Check out this article:

      http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/July-2003/The-Dry-Season/index.php?cparticle=1&siarticle=0#artanc

      I have lived 1/2 block from Wrigley since 1976 and in the last 5 or 6 years it has gotten totally out of control..

      Delete
    4. Try 3 years, right after the merge of the 19/23rd districts. Rahm has taken away over 100 police officers from our area, it's going to get worse. Please vote. Thank You CWB for keeping us informed.

      Delete
  2. If six of his ten largest contributors are in the booze business....you know how Tunny will vote on this issue.

    ReplyDelete
  3. So let me get this straight....you own a bar, get inspected by the city non stop, pay fees up the ying yang, are forced to allow people in that you know are not going to drink (aka $$) because you don't want the city after you for being racist....then, if one of these pieces of sh** pull a knife on someone (even though the doorman alerted police, ran down the street with the police and pointed the offender out), your bar can be closed indefinitely? Unless you are connected,then nothing will happen. Stop giving the city unlimited power, it corrupts an already unbelievitably system. This ordinance is a really bad idea to address a shooting at the Green Dolphin (nice double homicide).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good points, on the face both pieces of legislation seem like good practical steps (finally). Wish we could get some common sense on the budget. Your point is a good one, what about adding language where the close down for a hearing only occurs after multiple incidents? i.e. Green Dolphin has to go, but a one time bar fight gets more process. Frankly Green Dolphin has had a long process, how many shootings over how many years? That place on Ashland with the shootings across form the gas station needs to go as well.

      Delete
    2. I fail to see the race element in this, really. We have more than enough BRAHS causing trouble in our neck of the woods that it pretty much applies to everyone who acts like a D-bag. And yes, because of the horrible "externalities" that come with certain drinking establishments (fights, public urination, sexual assault, garbage, noise, loitering), they do deserve to be regulated, and city should have unlimited power in policing them.

      Delete
  4. Placing the responsibility of an individual's illegal behavior on the establishment in which he was drinking is back-asswards thinking so typical of Democrats. Why should the bar owner be punished and why should all the patrons that can no longer go there be punished and why should tax revenue be lost because one jerk broke the law? Rather than punishing those who are innocent, how about placing a MANDATORY 25 year sentence on anyone who pulls a knife in a bar? Or a MANDATORY 50 year sentence on anyone who fires a handgun in a bar? Or a MANDATORY life sentence on anyone who commits a battery on a police officer?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree. The proposed laws punish those who are not responsible. The laws should hold people accountable for their PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY. Make someone responsible for his own actions. On the other hand, if closing businesses is the only goal, we could ultimately look forward to a boarded up, barren neighborhood similar to those in the most blighted sections of the city.

      Delete
    2. Yes. Shutting down a bar because of an individual's bad behavior would be similar to shutting down an expressway because someone was caught speeding.

      Delete
  5. Being able to close problem bars seems like a practical step. However, this is Chicago and any power given to the city will be abused. Didn't donate to my campaign? Closed. Didn't let my cousin have a private party? Revoked. Three Gang shooting but owned by an aldercreature's buddy? Open.

    It's a law that, if we had great civil servants with public interests in mind, would be great.

    But we don't.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are right in a sad way.

      One doesn't have to be too smart to see how the bars in Wrigleyville overserve their customers on a regular basis. One reason is the debt incurred to participate in the pay to play system.

      There's nothing wrong with more local neighborhood pressure to get rid of these businesses.

      Delete
  6. In theory this is a good idea, but this is Chicago. We know this will get abused and the owner of the bar will be punished more than the person who did the crime in their establishment.

    I think Reilly is trying to position himself for a post-Rahm Mayoral attempt in 2019/2023.

    ReplyDelete