Monday, January 05, 2015

NUMBERS GAME: Crime Down 94% In New York City

The Chicago Police Department may be scraping the bottom of the misleading statistics barrel.

During a year-end press conference last week, Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy boasted that, while the number of people shot in Chicago rose by a double-digit percentage in 2014, the year will go down with the "second lowest shooting number on record."

One detail that he omitted? The city has only kept track of shootings for four years.
"Asked Monday about claims police sometimes look for ways to make statistics appear more favorable, McCarthy responded, "Nonsense."  —NBCChicago
Lolz.

Let's Hear It For New York

Meanwhile, an unofficial work slowdown by the New York City Police Department last week demonstrates nicely how crime goes "down" when fewer police reports are completed. (Like, by reducing the number of police officers working in our district by 25%.)

From the New York Post:
…overall arrests [were] down 66 percent for the week starting Dec. 22 compared with the same period in 2013, stats show.
Citations for traffic violations fell by 94 percent, from 10,069 to 587, during that time frame.
Summonses for low-level offenses like public drinking and urination also plunged 94 percent — from 4,831 to 300.
Even parking violations are way down, dropping by 92 percent, from 14,699 to 1,241.
Drug arrests by cops assigned to the NYPD’s Organized Crime Control Bureau — which are part of the overall number — dropped by 84 percent, from 382 to 63.
Betcha New Yorkers didn't "perceive" how much safer they were that week.
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15 comments:

  1. You really can't blame police officers in either city for not giving 100% (yet the vast majority still do) considering they are shit on constantly by the clowns leading them and their cities, and the citizens that they protect.

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    1. I agree.

      Did you see that photo of Pawar & Deb Mel holding protest signs on Second City Cop. Shameful.

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  2. Thanks for this analysis! It is great to have another reference to support the argument that crime number may appear to decline simply due to less police enforcement and arrests.

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  3. So we can eliminate crime completely if we reduce the number of police officers to zero?

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    Replies
    1. Sounds like the same "math" used to reduce the unemployment rate - the more people that drop out of the workforce and give up looking, the better the jobs report. No arrests...no crimes.

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  4. Well, at least Prince Rahm is now doing something about crime...at his residence. He's making sure the police fix the "blind spots" that were discovered around his residence. See, he's always willing to go above and beyond to keep everyone safe (in his own family). What a little prick.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/politics/ct-rahm-emanuel-met-0106-20150105-story.html

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  5. After son's mugging, Emanuel says police target 'blind spots' on his block
    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/politics/ct-rahm-emanuel-met-0106-20150105-story.html

    I'll take a wild guess -- the "blind spots" will be filled by redeploying more officers from 19 to the Mayor's security detail...

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    Replies
    1. In my 42 years of living in Chicago, I think that is the most royal thing I've ever heard come out of a mayor's mouth. Deluded enough to think we're concerned for the blind spots on his block in the face of crime on our own blocks, and double-deluded enough to actually come out and make it a focal point of a new conference. Kim Jong Emanuel.

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    2. Good to know his son will be safe when buying herbs from south side youths.

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    3. He was talking to his college counselor : https://pbs.twimg.com/media/B6n7drmCMAA2IQ_.jpg

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    4. Riggghhhhtttt.

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  6. A C- average in Chicago public schools means honor student so why shouldn't fewer police to make arrests mean less crime?

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  7. Ha. A few of us readers discovered this garbage article apparently. What a prick.

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  8. Time for NYC, Chicago and other cities to reconsider using the police to generate revenue. Even the courts are mostly empty in NYC these days. The police in NYC are expected to "empty their ticket books", incredible pressure to generate revenue. Then the public gets mad at the police for writing so many tickets. Got any problem with this system? If we want the police to concentrate on major crimes, the public needs to support replacing the lost revenue.

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