Saturday, October 11, 2014

UPDATE: Charges Filed In Friday's Sheffield Garage Attack

Scott (Cook Co. Sheriff's Office)
A 28-year-old convicted felon, out on parole for just two months, has been charged in connection with Friday morning's attack of a woman in a Wrigleyville garage.

Ozzie Scott of the 7100 block of S. Cornell Avenue is charged with attempted armed robbery and aggravated battery causing great bodily harm. Bail is set at $1 million.

Police categorized the incident as an attempted criminal sexual assault but that branch of the investigation apparently did not pass prosecutorial muster.

According to the Chicago Tribune:
The woman...told police that Scott tried to rape her, and told her to be quiet as she struggled to take out her mace.
No sex crime charges have been filed.

Officers responding to a neighbor's 5:15AM report of screams coming from a garage in the 3300 block of Sheffield found the 25-year-old victim on the ground with a bloody face. Scott, still on-scene, was taken into custody.

Police say the victim suffered a broken eye socket and may also have bleeding on her brain. She is in serious but stable condition at Illinois Masonic Medical Center.

Illinois Department of Corrections records show that Scott was paroled in August after serving more than 6 years for armed robbery, aggravated battery to a peace officer, and possessing a weapon in a penal institution.
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34 comments:

  1. Why not post when you release his name what his actual sentence was, and what he actually served? I can bet there is a BIG difference. This is where the real, bonafide outrage should be. At why criminals serve merely a percentage of what they are ordered to serve. Instead of writing letters to the mayor who apparently doesn't care, people should be camping out on Governor's lawn day and night demanding that the he order his prison and parole board to force convicted criminals to serve 100% of their sentence. Not 25, Not 50, Not 75. Instead our Governor has had a special, secret early release program that allowed felons serve less than a third of their sentence. This is where the OUTRAGE should be. This woman is now scarred for life when it could have been avoided if he simply served the time he was sentenced to. Its not rocket science folks. There should be no such thing as parole, you're either in prison or not. If you rape someone, and your sentenced for 30 years, the public should not see them in 15 or 20 years on parole. Why don't people see whats right in front of their eyes? The Governor is ultimately in charge of the State and the Prisons, he is 100% responsible for allowing prisoners out before serving their sentence. But yet, he will keep getting re-elected because he defies common sense and has more compassion for criminal thugs than innocent victims.

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    1. Great post. spot on. CIB, why no mention of the original sentence? Are they withholding that info. It's a major part of the story.

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    2. "why no mention of the original sentence?"

      Because we do not know if he was sentenced to serve the terms concurrently, consecutively, or some combination thereof.

      He was sentenced to 6 years for robbery, 3 years for the aggravated battery, and 4 years for smuggling the weapon.

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    3. This reason is the #1 reason of many as to why Quinn will NEVER get my vote. In fact, I plan on voting against EVERY SINGLE incumbent from now on. The lack of concern for the public is appalling.

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    4. DITTO! The unknown, confusing selections: JUDGES = wish we had some solid guidance there.

      And, as we've learned, many are bleeding hearts, putting our safety last when they sentence or approve early release (if they're the ones who do that). I've wondered if there's some stealthy *star chamber* directive that's come down from on high to go easy on sentencing because .. as they affect EVERY SINGLE OTHER AREA .. state, county, city treasuries are in the red, and that totally affects jail/prison budgeting. It's such a vicious cycle caused by a totally corrupt political/governing machine and SO infuriating.

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  2. Here's another story we would have never known about had it not been for CWB. Thank you for everything!

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    1. I second that. Thank you very much, CWB.

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    2. Thank you Anonymouses and Russ. We greatly appreciate your readership and whatever steps you take—no matter how big or small—to make things better.

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  3. Any update on the second person who you earlier reported was also detained?

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    1. Our very early information was that two people were detained. It's entirely possible that the second person was a neighbor on-scene or, given the unfolding events, the victim herself.

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  4. Nice work by an alert neighbor and a great response by our district's finest.
    Likewise, kudos to CWB for reporting this promptly notwithstanding the media blackout on area crime.

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    1. They finally got in .. yesterday.

      http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/chi-lake-view-attack-20141011-story.html

      http://www.myfoxchicago.com/story/26763494/man-charged-with-wrigleyville-beating-attempted-robbery

      OMG - sickening = that poor, suffering gal = this was a brutally savage crime by an vicious animal, scum of the earth. Throw away the key .. keep this monster behind bars for good. I pray she can heal and not be physically disabled and emotionally scarred for the rest of her life. I don't think I could. God bless her.

      ** He then entered the woman’s car and pushed her face with his hand, attempting to close the car door, which resulted in him banging her head against the concrete, prosecutors said. The woman later told police that Scott tried to rape her, and told her to be quiet as she struggled to take out her mace.

      She suffered from right temporal bone fracture, bleeding of the brain and a hemorrhage in her right ear, police said.**

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  5. What is someone who lives at 71st. and Cornell doing around Belmont and Sheffield? Are predators coming to the neighborhood for easy prey? If video cameras are not recording everyone who enters and exits the Belmont L Stop, than why not? I really think it all started with the Center On Halsted.
    P.S. From his mug shot, the smallest part of his head appears to be that which holds his brain.

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    1. In this case? Robbing and beating a woman.

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    2. I think they come up here ..because they can walk around all night and not worry about getting shot at as they would if they were doing it in their own hood....The people who live in this area are usually not in gangs out at 4am looking for other rival gang members....I live at Belmont/Sheffield and i am pretty sure the crowd at the corner of Enstiens does not live in this area

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  6. I remember when 71st and Cornell was a very elegant area. So much for that. BTW, anon# 1 the early release program is conducted by the courts and the prison system. Nice ad hoc attack on Quinn, though.

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    1. MMMM. Or not. http://bigstory.ap.org/article/0d7dbccfa38849e1a9bdd43ab1e6371c/fact-check-rauner-early-prison-release-tv-ad

      In a fundraising email to supporters, Quinn campaign manager Lou Bertuca responded that "Gov. Quinn didn't authorize a single early release. In fact, the very day he found out about the program, he shut it down."

      FACTS: It's true that Quinn suspended early release within hours of the AP's report, and permanently terminated it at the end of that month. But two days after the article, Quinn said he had known about the program and claimed it had been well-publicized, but wouldn't say why he was halting it. The next day, he said then-Corrections Director Michael Randle had not followed specific instructions to bar violent offenders from early release.

      When he formally ended the good-time program Dec. 30, 2009, Quinn said he hadn't known about the program until reading the AP account.

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  7. The parole board in this state is way too lax. Personally, I think people who commit violent crimes shouldn't even have a chance at parole. Do the crime, do the time!

    I'd really like to see some sort of 3 strikes law come into play with certain crime categories that encompass being a threat to the public. We need politicians and judges who are tough on crime. This is out of control and the public is being put at a greater risk with these animals back in public.

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  8. Any mention of this crime in the sun times or Tribune?

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    1. Only this afternoon, after charges were announced in a press release.

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  9. How about locking up Scott at Belmont and Sheffield and let average citizens beat the crap out of him.
    Cheaper than prison and could be a great tourist attraction.

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  10. 60 days after this thug is released from prison and on parole he is arrested with serious felonies. WITHIN 60 DAYS!!!!! The thug criminal element is not in fear of our system. Never will be. A fat 5'06'' 211# thug who laughs at our criminal courts and incarceration further mocking it by attacking women in dark alleys within 60 days of being released. And people on parole are supposed to be on their best behavior, Yeah Right! Keep giving guys like this 3rd, and 10th, 16th chances. Maybe next time someone with a concealed carry permit will teach 'em a lesson while defending themselves instead of expecting our pathetic incarceration to do something. People who read this blog actually fear a parking ticket, these men don't blink twice robbing, raping, and killing you. Scary, but very true.

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    1. "People who read this blog actually fear a parking ticket, these men don't blink twice robbing, raping, and killing you. Scary, but very true."

      So true. The few times I have gotten pulled over for speeding, or whatever, I am sweating it and feeling crappy.

      In reading CWB that is the one thing that, for me, was a big surprise. How many of these scumbags commit violent crimes only to get probation. For example, no reader of CWB would ever think of carrying a gun illegally but the criminals do it all the time because they know they really won't be punished. No wonder they call it Chiraq.

      Burglary tools, turn them over and walk straight the hardware store to steal some more tools. Assault and battery, wrist slap. Illegal gun (which, BTW, carrying an unregistered gun with no FOID and CCW is three separate felonies), probation. I mean, if I was a copper my head would burst from watching these dirt bags getting no punishment. Why even bother arresting them?

      These people may be scumbags, etc., but the one thing they sure seem to know is how to game the system.

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  11. Question: does the Gov control the parole boards? Does he have the automatic authority to change rules and policies or dictate to parole boards? I never heard of this so somebody please enlighten me.

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  12. This is an absolute tragedy. Many things need to be done to prevent similar things from happening into the future to whatever degree possible. However, addressing only the justice system is not treating the root cause of these types of incidents, only its symptoms.

    I don't remember where I read it, but I recently read that the U.S. has something like 20 times more people in prison today than it did 40 years ago, and not because we have 20 times more people, our population growth has been much slower by comparison. We also have more people in prison per capita than any first world country by such orders of magnitude that it's not even funny.

    It seems to me that people commit violent crimes because they feel they have nothing to lose. The economics of opportunity are getting worse in this country all the time. When college educations, decent jobs, and real opportunities to improve one's life seem completely unobtainable, we create an environment where a violent crime starts to look like an opportunity. In Western Europe a server in a restaurant working 35-40 hours a week makes a livable wage without being dependent on tips, and the government provides universal healthcare. In our country, a person could work as a server at two restaurants for 60+ hours a week and still not make enough to afford an apartment, food, and basic healthcare.

    I'm not suggesting this guy should not be responsible for his own actions. I think they should string this guy up and let the victim, her family and friends whack on him with pry bars like a piniata. I'm also not suggesting that I think universal healthcare and decent wages for servers would make violent crime go away (though I think they would be a start in the right direction). But trying to put more people behind more bars, and for longer sentences, is not the solution to our violent crime problem. That creates more single moms, more children without a father figure (and the statistics on fatherless children and violent crime are alarming). Addressing the fact that the richest nation in the world has a social floor so low that it dehumanizes people, and that one fifth of our country lives at or below a poverty level that is not high enough to truly capture nearly all the people who are unable to make ends meet while living even the meagerest of lifestyles - that will do much more to affect our violent crime problem than electing a new mayor or alderman. We are the only 1st world country on the planet with a serious violent crime problem, we are also the only country whose socioeconomic and govermental systems are proactively working against its average to below average citizen.

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    1. If you are working 2 jobs 60+ hours per week as a server and you cannot afford rent food and healthcare, you are a very bad server and need to find a different line of work.

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    2. Come back on the smart remarks, there, Anonymous. He didn't say HE worked two jobs at 60+ hours a week. Who are you to determine whether that person is a very bad server, and suggesting another line of work.

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    3. Less kids are the answer.

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    4. Even a half-decent server working in a mid-scale restaurant can average about $15 per hour in tips (mostly charity tips from customers who always tip even if the service isn't that great). If that server is working 60 hours per week, he/she is making $900 per week, and that doesn't even include wages added in. So a server working that much should easily be able to afford a half-decent apartment, food, and healthcare.

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    5. I am not a server at any restaurants. However, a quick google search I found from the bureau of labor statistics that the mean annual income for a full time server is $20,880. That would be a 40+ hour work week right there. Lets suppose for a moment it would even be possible to add a few shifts at another restaurant for an additional 20 hours per week (which would be difficult as many servers are required to have open availability), and working part time managed to make an additional $7,500 per year. Even in the lowest tax bracket let's say that taxes and social security are going to eat up about 25% of your income. Already you are down to $21,285 in take home pay. You have two kids and live in a dingy 2 bedroom apartment in a crap neighborhood for $800 per month. Now you are down to less than $12,000 on the year. Food for three people, even on the cheap is another 300-400 per month. Split the difference and now you are down to around $7,500 left for the year, or just over $600 per month. You still haven't paid for transportation costs, school/book expenses, possibly additional utilities, clothes, emergency planning, etc. Health insurance for three individuals, quickly becomes out of reach.

      I have a good job and a spouse with a good job. I have never had to experience that type of lifestyle and hope to never have to. But to ignore the fact that this type of lifestyle and these kinds of difficult decisions are a way of life for more than 1/4 of our country is stupid.

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  13. Parole Board members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate: http://appointments.illinois.gov/appointmentsDetail.cfm?id=221

    For some history see:
    http://illinoistimes.com/article-11086-illinois-starts-giving-prison-inmates-release-credits.html

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  14. OK, Mr. or Ms. "Raise the Minimum Wage and Crime Disappears": If you really believed this to be a tragedy or have any sort of compassion, You wouldn't make your asinine comments about "let's feel sorry for the poor criminal" argument. This woman is laying in a hospital bed with dozens of stitches and will relive this horrific day for years to come. How dare you?! People like this man, if found guilty, and all these thieves, robbers, burglars, rapists, and murderers don't deserve rehabilitation. You know why? Because they can't be. It's people with mentalities of compassion for the criminal, instead of the victim, that condone their activity are nearly as liable as the perpetrator. This is not a poverty verse wealth issue, not a black verse white issue, or a gay verse straight issue. WRONG IS WRONG IS WRONG. If you need to be taught that raping a woman, or bashing someone in the skull for their iPhone, or committing a home invasion is wrong: Then there is no hope. Don't do the crime, if you can't do the time. Lock 'em up and say Buh-bye. I would sign a petition to Quinn and Preckwinkle to raise our taxes for more jails & more prisons, but they're too busy sympathizing and releasing the inmates to get their votes. Who else would vote for these clowns?

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    1. I don't know if you are responding to my comments, particularly as I posted as anonymous, but I believe you are. I stated above that this guy should be held responsible for his own actions, strung up, and beaten senseless by the victim, her friends and family. I also believe that many criminals are beyond rehabilitation.

      I also stand by my original point, that violent crime is not a justice system problem, it is a socioeconomic problem. The justice system doesn't create criminals, our socioeconomic system does. To suggest otherwise leads me to believe you have your head buried in the sand, or you have not traveled other countries extensively or lived in another country. Have you ever asked yourself why out of the dozens of "first world" countries on the planet, ours is the only one with a serious violent crime problem?

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