Saturday, October 18, 2014

JOCK JAMMED: Sports Reporter Charged With Battery In Taxi Incident; Victim Declines Felony Option

Police guard the abandoned taxi at Waveland and Lake Shore Drive.
UPDATE OCTOBER 21: Details of the court filing are up. Klemko did not escape unscathed.
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Robert Klemko, Sports Illustrated’s Chicago-based NFL reporter and a frequent sports media guest, was arrested in his Lake View condo early Saturday morning, after a Checker taxi driver reported being cabjacked.

Klemko, 27, gained significant media exposure after live Tweeting his "arrest" during the Ferguson riots.  He did not turn to social media during today's arrest.

CWB sources say Klemko is charged with two misdemeanors—simple battery and criminal trespass to a vehicle—in connection with the incident that police classified as vehicular hijacking. The victim reportedly did not want to pursue felony charges.

Klemko (USA Today)
Police responded to Klemko’s high rise at Irving Park and Pine Grove around 1AM after a janitor called 911 to report that a cabbie was in the lobby—shaken after being allegedly battered and carjacked by one or more passengers.

The cabbie told police that Klemko and his companions became fares off of Delaware Place downtown and headed to the Lakeview location.

At some point after the alleged confrontation, Klemko headed to his apartment. How the taxi cab got from Klemko's building to Waveland and Lake Shore Drive while the cabbie was in his lobby is a bit of a mystery. Three or four other passengers were reported to have been in the cab when it traveled to Lake View.

Detectives are working to identify other suspects in the case, CPD  #HX472070.
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16 comments:

  1. I'm still not sure why he was in Ferguson.

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    1. 100% self serving reasons. Get "cred" by being arrested. You know, Journalism 101.

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    2. Notice he doesn't LIVE there...just visits to stir up shit.

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  2. I wonder why he didn't live tweet this arrest?

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  3. He probably went out and got drunk. Have too much to drink, act like a jerk and POOF there goes your career. I think he committed the high crime of stupidity.

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    1. It may be news to you, but there are responsible, mature people who drink everyday and don't turn into violent, crazed, criminal savage douches. Drinking too much only unleashes the true character of the individual...it does not create monsters out of true ladies or gentlemen. A sober douche who then drinks too much just becomes a drunk douche.

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  4. Curious as to why the victim didn't want to pursue felony charges. Wonder what else there could be to the story. Klemko seems like a d-bag, and I'd never heard of him before.

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  5. Asshole. I hope he gets fired.

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  6. He is now an animal like the rest. You can not do whatever you want even when you are drunk. It is not a pass because you were drunk when you break the law. A normal person knows what's right and wrong, and legal and not legal. Hope you lose everything.

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  7. The cabbie didn't want to pursue felony charges? Since when does the victim determine whether a crime is a felony or not? Pressing charges is one thing, determining what the charge is should be a whole different matter.

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    1. The State's Attorney decides what charges, if any, to file. They have broad discretion and, given the totality of the case, may be less likely to pursue elevated charges if they believe the victim will be a reluctant participant.

      Let's say a man jumps into an everyday family's car, batters or threatens the driver with a weapon, then steals the car for unknown purposes.

      Now, let's say a man is out on a Friday night, has a couple of extra drinks, takes a cab home, has an altercation with the cabbie, jumps behind the wheel and takes the cab on a short joyride.

      In both cases, the victim does not wish for the defendant to be vigorously prosecuted. That is more likely to be substantively influential in the second scenario.

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    2. The cabbie probably accepted $1,000 cash to not "take it too far".

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  8. If a victim will not cooperate with a felony charge an offender cannot be charged with a felony. More than likely, instead of sitting around for 5-6 hours to be interviewed by detectives and a states attorney before a felony could be charged, the victim, a working man, chose to sign a misdemeanor complaint so he could be on his way in 20 minutes and start earning his living again. People need to understand reality in crime fighting - it's not like you see on TV.

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  9. Has anyone seen any reporting of this incident anywhere? (other than CWB)

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    1. The Score mentioned it. That will be about all, probably. The media reporters protect their own.

      Just a couple of days ago, every paper and all the TV stations carried stories about one ONE Chicago cop who got busted for DUI. He didn't wreck his car o hurt anyone. Because he is one of 12,000 Chicago cops, though, they crucify him for what is admittedly unacceptable behavior.

      When one of their buddies beats up a cabbie and the taxi gets stolen or carjacked or what ever happened, there won't be a peep. As a seasoned cop about Walter Jacobson's DUI habits and then see how often those stories wound up on the news.

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  10. It sounds like Klemko was very drunk, and it sounds like Klemko took the cab and drove it to waveland and lake shore drive. If he was driving while intoxicated, the police can press charges, in which case, Klemko would not go to jail, but would have to pay a ton of money in legal fees and fines and do some community service.

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