Thursday, July 24, 2014

WELCOME BACK: Robbery, Hate Crime Convict Returns To Boystown...With A Stolen Car

A Boystown foot patrol officer's hunch uncovered a stolen car and an interesting character in our neighborhood around 5 o'clock Wednesday evening.

After running the license plate of a vehicle in the 7-Eleven parking lot at Roscoe and Halsted, the officer learned that the car—a 2002 Buick—had been reported stolen out of Park Ridge.

The 27-year-old driver of the auto, who just finished parole on May 1st, was taken into custody for criminal trespass to a vehicle.

Court records show that he was sentenced to four years in prison in 2010 for robbery, aggravated battery, and a hate crime that took place in Boystown. He was paroled after serving slightly more than two years.

Oh, yes. One more thing. His address of record? 3179 N. Broadway, the former home of the Broadway Youth Center.
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29 comments:

  1. Strong work officer

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    1. I agree. Good job!

      Don't ya just love it...a 27-year-old "youth."

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  2. Great job, Officer! Thank you.

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  3. Excellent insight and followup - thank you, CPD officer! These dregs are being released from jail early so often = the judicial system here is also a problem without a doubt. But in the end: it all comes down to $$ = red ink = broke city, county, state = that impacts every part of the crime/criminal justice system and the quality of our lives. And that comes down to politics, the Machine, and who gets elected to run things and control the treasury.

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  4. Can anyone explain what the attraction of the 7-Eleven is to these lowlifes? There's always something going on there.

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    1. It's "ground zero" - Roscoe & Halsted.

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  5. Brilliant! Thank you, Officer!

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  6. Takes a special someone to want to steal a Buick. Damn. Hitting rock bottom seems like an understatement.

    Rot in hell douchebag.

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    1. if only hell meant 10 years in prison. but, somehow i doubt that...

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  7. Is the parole board just rubberstamping these releases? Seems like a lot of parolees end up committing crimes shortly after their release.

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    1. It kinda seems that way....like a revolving door. What ever happend to the 3 strikes & your out law?? Seems most of the douchebag offenders had their 3rd strike about 20 arrests ago.

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    2. Just remember our Governor released hundreds of inmates several times already to save money, Preckwinkle also likes to release county inmates to save money as well

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    3. Perhaps the real focus should be on fixing the community and the economic issues which plague our country, particularly poor urban and rural areas, and not on making more jails than we have land? Nah, that's too hard and hurts everyone's head.

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    4. Sounds like a catch & release program to me. It's as if the powers that be only care about police duties that involve revenue for the city, like writing tickets & red light cameras. A couple yuppies in the park, drinking wine with their picnic? Write everyone a $100 ticket. Steal a car, beat up and rob someone - or worse - get a slap on the wrist or a very short stay behind bars.

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    5. Illinois does not have a "three strikes and your out" law. It is not necessarily a good law when you see people committed to life when one of the three convictions was for theft of a bike or use of a narcotic, as was the case in California. If written in Illinois, I would hope it would be modified to the commission of three major offenses.

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    6. Anyone who commits 3 felonies deserves to be put away for life, regardless of whether one of the felonies was a "major" offense.

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    7. You know what annon? Too bad for them, if you know you have two strikes on you and you choose to risk your freedom to steal a bike, too bad for you enjoy your jail cell for life loser!

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    8. I agree with a lot of posts....but to waste jail space for a bike theft seems silly. How about a fines and/or community service for smaller crimes? To actually "pay" for their crime...they just might learn something. But I agree....assholes that commit major offenses - especially violent ones - deserve to be locked up for life. They are worthless and contribute NOTHING to society.

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    9. You would not think it was a waste of jail space if it had been your bike that was stolen.

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    10. Neither do most bike thieves, lock them up too.

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  8. Great job officer, put that animal back in his cage!

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  9. I do hope our amazing Police Officers read this blog. The Chicago CPD are the absolute FINEST!!! Love you wonderful men and women in blue!

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  10. A couple of yuppies drinking wine in the park is illegal. They deserve the $100 tickets. Of course, they will pay them unlike the street folks who get dozens & dozens of them. NYC used the "broken windows" crime fighting strategy & they really turned it around. Public drinking, panhandling, jaywalking, ect...all fall into that mode.

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    1. What is the "broken windows" strategy?

      Of course the yuppies will pay their tickets...and the bums will not....and continue to get away with it. Perhaps they should force them to pick up trash or something if they can't pay their fines.

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    2. The internet is a wonderful thing. Try a search for "broken windows strategy"
      And to speed things up:
      http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2013-03-11/news/chi-mccarthy-touts-broken-windows-crimefighting-strategy-20130311_1_public-urination-chicago-police-crime-fighting-strategy

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    3. Quick lesson, Broken Windows is a theory that says if police make a strong showing in aggressive policing by making arrests for minor offenses like breaking windows, graffiti, littering, public urination, public drinking, jaywalking, and other similar quality of life offenses, then the incentive and opportunity for more serious crime is reduced or eliminated.
      "Nip it in the bud," as Deputy Barney Fife would say.
      "Broken Windows" ideally interferes with the Crime Triangle: Criminal Desire, Criminal Ability, and Criminal Opportunity.
      While New York City Police was embarking on its Broken Windows campaign, the Chicago was settling in with CAPS [Community Alternative Policing Strategy] and we see how well that's worked out.

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    4. Now let me start by saying that, as a black man, I have no problem with forcing public service on criminals. But I also see organizations like operation push and the ACLU have huge issues with "forcing" a human being to do labor... For obvious reasons.

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