Tuesday, July 15, 2014

THE BEST AT BEING THE WORST: Wrigleyville, Boystown Reclaims #1 Robbery Status

This screen shot from the
Chicago Police Department's
CLEARMap site shows local
police beat 1924 has reached first
place for robberies over a rolling
90-day period.
Hi fives all around, baby!

As CWB predicted last Monday, Wrigleyville and Boystown has reached the #1 spot on the Chicago Police Department's list of places to go if you want to be robbed.

Well, they don't call it "places to go if you want to be robbed." They call it "Ranking of Police Beat by Robbery Count — Past 90 Days ~ 3 Months."

The department carves up the city into 274 individual patrol areas ("beats") and beat #1924, which covers the sliver of real estate between Belmont, Addison, Southport, and Halsted is now the most robbery-filled piece of land in Chicago.

Beat 1924 also held the #1 spot for several months in 2013.

Through July 7th, robberies in the whole of Wrigleyville and Boystown—police beats 1923, 1924, and 1925 combined—are down 27% compared to last year.

Congratulations, everyone. Fireball shots are on us.
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31 comments:

  1. And these numbers are most likey deflated.

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  2. Yep. Don't forget the robberies that are downgraded to thefts. And no way to incorporate the number of robbery victims that left the scene without reporting the offense because no police were available to respond. And finally, in this neighborhood in particular, you have a number of victims who don't report the offenses because they're fearful of the response of police and don't want family members and friends to know they associate in the Boystown area. [Hint: gay bars and they're not "gay"].
    CPD will spin this and cast doubt on the numbers and only highlight the overall lower numbers.
    And, of course, our aldermen are duly complicit in allowing the police department to fall to such numbers that they can't serve and protect the public.

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    1. It would be interesting to see them cast doubt on the numbers. The numbers and rankings come from their own web site.

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    2. The police have ramped up the patrols downtown and this has decreased the "wildings" and the petty theft. They now need to do that in Wriggleyville and keep an eye on Lincoln Park - where the bad guys will go next after pushed out of Wriggleyville.

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    3. They don't have enough cops.

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  3. More police probably would help the situation but I think part of the problem is the nature of the prey. The thugs come to where the picking is easy, plentiful, and rewarding. Walking around drunk after midnight checking your smart phone is just plain dumb. Please be aware at night and try not to walk alone.

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    1. I agree that you must be smart, pay attention to your surroundings and attempt to not make yourself an easy target. I disagree, however, with the premise that it is the victim's fault for making themselves a target (I know thats not necessarily what you meant to say) as I personally feel that idea ignores the fact that this neighborhood is worsening where crime incidents are concerned. 9 years ago when I first moved to E. Lakeview; the area had a completely different feel. Yes, it was a still a neighborhood in a big city. Yes, you still had to make sure you were aware of your surroundings (just as you do in Lincoln Park, Gold Coast, River North), yes crime happened here, too. But no.. there was not as much "riffraff" running around. No, people were not getting mugged (at gunpoint!) behind my building. No, there was not a community center (of which I dare not speak its name) that lets its patrons out into the streets upon closing-time while taking zero responsibility for their actions and calling you a "racist" or a "bigot" if you question their policies (I am neither). I agree that thugs often do come to areas where the picking is easy but would go a step further to add that they stick around in areas where they get away with those actions. It's new turf. A new playground. I go where I'm most comfortable, too, after all. And speaking of, fast forward to today: my partner and I were upgrading our living situation 6 months ago (needed more space). We opted against buying our new home in Lakeview and, instead, chose another city neighborhood. One of our top reasons in not re-investing in Lakeview was the lack of safety we began to feel over the course of the past several years. The park I used to jog in is now where known gang members have recently shot one another. The quiet block we used to walk the dog down is a location that I personally know of 2 people who were mugged on. I continue to keep an eye on Lakeview (and this blog) because the neighborhood will always have a special place in my heart and many of my friends are still there and I hope that things turn around. I'm so saddened by the area's new path but thankful for citizens like you and the others here who are paying attention and to the admin(s). of this site for their constant reporting. Keep up the good work, don't stop pushing things things into the spotlight and let's all try our best to be involved in making positive changes in that great neighborhood.

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    2. The area is a target rich environment for people wanting to do crime. Period. Ask the police. Most of the robbery and burglary suspects they arrest don't live anywhere near here.

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    3. I'll speak their names, Anonymous...for those who still may not know. The Center on Halsted, the Broadway Youth Center and The Crib. There, cat's out of the bag! What to do now?

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  4. Either take back your streets or surrender to them. Fight for your community or lose it in the blight. The choice is yours.

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    1. Question: If you live in the neighborhood, what are you doing to fight for the community?

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    2. Here's what our "alderman" in ward 44 is doing about it .... having a picnic day. Check out the photos. Guess all the issues with not having enough police officers, all the thuggings and muggings, etc., have been resolved. This appalls me: https://www.facebook.com/AldTomTunney

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    3. One would think that calling the police would be part of the solution. However, from what I am gathering, nobody gets charged unless a complaint is filed. So, having not seen one of the complaints, I have to ask: do you have to put your name and address on the complaint, and does the alleged/accused get access to this? Because I can damn well see, if that is the case, why few people are filing the complaints.

      So how do we "fight for the community"?

      --If you call the police, you might not get a response in a reasonable amount of time.

      --You can't expect Lakeview/Wrigleyville/Boystown to all file for and get CCW permits, take self defense classes, etc., nor would that be a reasonable solution (I don't want to be around when the guns come out, for example).

      --You can't expect folks to take on their attackers when they are outnumbered.

      --Do we set up 12AM to 5AM volunteer "watch groups" to stand at the corners and call the police when we see crime?

      What?

      See -- in every other city I lived in, the police were the ones empowered and charged with keeping the peace. So, I'm a little confused as to what we are to do? BTW, I already emailed my alderman. I'm sure it is being ignored along with every other email addressing the topic...

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    4. Any where you go in this country, a victim must sign a complaint for police to take action. Unless the victim is dead, of course. Victims should sign complaints and go to court. Very simple.

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    5. The question was, paraphrased: do you have to put your name and address on the complaint? It sounds like that is the case (since you would have to face the offenders, I presume -- sorry, I've never been to criminal court nor am I an attorney, etc.).

      I don't disagree with the concept, but can understand why (if people have to sign, etc.) there may be some reticence to sign/appear.

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  5. Thank You!! CWB, this by far is the best site to stay informed. I don't bother with the media, they just don't care what happens in our area.

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  6. I'm not quite sure if I left Lakeview because of the passive residents or the criminals. It was pretty much a tie.

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  7. This has to start catching up to businesses? My partner and I (Mt. Greenwood and Oak Lawn) have drastically reduced the amount of times we visit. It used to be a mini vacation a few times a month. The atmosphere and sense of freedom are there, but a criminal element has invaded.


    One, someone above says to retake the streets.

    Two, someone above says to change your behavior (do not walk around drunk after midnight).

    We cannot have it both ways.

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  8. Oh gosh this is so exciting! What a great honor! And here's to the people and organizations that we can thank for this wonderful distinction:

    First, thanks to the scumbags that come into our neighborhood from the surrounding areas....the gangbangers...the people who post up on Belmont in their folding chairs at night with their 'juice', just to enjoy all of the wonderful things that our hood has to offer. Second, a special shout out to the Center on Halsted and the Broadway Youth Center for attracting these fine individuals to our area with handouts. Next, how could I forget...our wonderful Alderman Tunney...who constantly has his eye on the ball regarding how big the signs will be in Wrigley Field while his constituents get robbed and beaten outside of their homes....and you just can't say enough about his failure to get more boots on the ground to protect the citizens....great work Tom. Finally, special thanks to McCarthy at the CPD (and also the mayor) for continually selling us the snake-oil line that 'crime is down.' Just awesome....what an amazing honor! I'm sure I'm forgetting someone...my apologies for any omissions.

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  9. @ Anonymous - going out after midnight while wearing headphones and acting like an idiot really doesn't apply to so many of the atrocious crimes being committed in Lakeview right now.

    How do you explain

    the woman who was raped in broad daylight near Halsted?

    or the Starbuck's employee who was robbed on Southport while waiting for the key holder to arrive?

    or the young mom pushing her child in a stroller who was robbed at 4 p.m. last week in Lincoln Park?

    or the cab drivers who were robbed of their daily receipts and actual cabs while doing something as horrible as their job?

    Really, it seems the only solution right now is to never leave home and you and I both know that isn't an option for people. Sure, people should be aware of their surroundings but the crime epidemic in our neighborhood right now is the fault of the criminals and the criminals alone.

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    1. I honestly felt safer walking in the South Loop when I lived down there after midnight than I do in daylight now up here. I can't wait to move. I'm sick of having to watch my back 24/7. It shouldn't have to come to where people have to move out of the neighborhood but it is happening - rapidly.

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  10. Im with Crabby on this one. Enough is more than enough.

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  11. My boyfriend walked up to two guys who were hanging out on a residential staircase who clearly didn't live in the neighborhood and asked directions to one of the infamous neighborhood bars just as a test to see if they frequent the businesses in the area. Isn't that why people from surrounding areas come out? To hang out at the establishments? (sarcasm) They had no idea what the place was or where it is located. He then proceeded to ask directions to the red line and they clearly had an answer for that...

    Within the hour they were spotted back at the Sheffield/Belmont corner. I guess the streets over there are considered to be "businesses" to the surrounding area "tourists"...

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    1. 7:52pm (still good day light) on a Tuesday evening awhile back, I found two thugs and a thuggette lounging on my porch -- attached to my house, set back 40 feet from the street, clearly not a common or "community" area -- and asked them to leave. They basically told me to go fuck myself and two of them lit up another marijuana cigarette. I called for police assistance, but I'm still waiting. That was 56 days ago. (Yes, Tommy Tunney, I have a porch light illuminated, always have, long before your crime-solving initiative of advising all of your constituents to turn on their porch lights. That "directive" was about as useful as last summer's "community walk" which accomplished little beyond showing off your sad sense of fashion.)

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  12. WE'RE NUMBER ONE!!! -- WE'RE NUMBER ONE!!

    U.S.A ...U.S.A.....U.S.A....U.S.A

    WHOOT... WHOOT!!

    Crime is down.

    If you like your doctor you can keep your doctor.

    Raising the debt limit will not raise the debt.

    The world is experiencing record tranquility.

    It's a recovery!

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  13. The solution will be? Carve up beat 1924 into some of the adjacent beats. Share the joy of Clark and Belmont with two or three beats and viola.. problem solved. It is all about managing the message, not stopping crime or improving the quality of life in our neighborhood.

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  14. yes, your information is on the criminal complaint. as well as your police report. all can be accessed by a defense lawyer or a F.O.I.A

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    1. Victim information is redacted in documents acquired through FOIA.

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  15. Someone who lives in the area should run for mayor as a Republican, focusing on crime and taxes. The democrat choice is Emmanuel or Karen Lewis who would be just as bad or even worse.

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    1. Choose between a slow acting painful poison or one that will kill the city quicker.

      Bless you for offering such a great solution. /end sarcasm

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