Thursday, January 23, 2014

IMPECCABLE TIMING (UPDATED): Battery Victim Seeks Help At Broadway Youth Center

UPDATE JANUARY 31: CWB has confirmed that the BYC client was injured in the event that was reported as "15 people fighting" on the street at 2:50PM.
----------------------

It looks like the Broadway Youth Center (BYC) "Good Neighbor Agreement" is going to get an early test.

Just two days after BYC received a zoning variance to operate on a residential street, a victim reported that he was beaten up by a known offender near Wellington and Broadway at 3PM Thursday. 

When police arrived, they were informed that the victim had gone to the Broadway Youth Center, 615 W. Wellington, to have a leg injury treated.

After receiving treatment, the victim was escorted by officers to the Center on Halsted, 3656 N. Halsted, in the belief that the attacker may have gone there. It does not appear that they were successful in their hunt for the offender, who is described as male, black, wearing a red hat and black jacket.  He was in the company of other males at the time of the attack.

A battery report has been filed. The case number is HX124943.

Just 10 minutes before this victim's 911 call came in, officers handled another call of 15 people fighting on the street at 3023 N. Broadway, about a half-block north of Wellington. It is not clear if the two incidents are related.

Under the terms of the BYC's Good Neighbor Agreement,
BYC staff or volunteers will monitor the Facility and immediate proximity to the Facility on days when BYC program participants are present during the regular hours of operation of the BYC programs. BYC staff or volunteers will have additional monitoring presence for one (1) hour before and for one (1) hour after the BYC Drop-in program begins and ends on days when this program is offered.
The drop-in program ended at 3PM Thursday, about 4 minutes before the victim's 911 call.

UPDATE 12:40PM
We asked Howard Brown Health Center General Counsel Michelle Wetzel about Thursday's incident.

Wetzel reports that,
[BYC] staff was present and helped break up the situation and escorted the youth back to the BYC where our nurse cleaned up and bandaged the youth’s knee.  In the meantime, the youth had called the police himself.  The police came and met the youth at the BYC.  The youth then went with the police to help the police identify his assailants.
Thursdays incident has been investigated and documented as called for by the Good Neighbor Agreement, Wetzel says. "This is exactly how our system is designed to work and it worked perfectly."

In a related development, Wetzel tells us that BYC is in the process of expanding the "monitoring area" that center staff will patrol beyond the front of their operation.
---------------------
---------------------

23 comments:

  1. They have a GNA?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. According to the alderman's office, they are bound by the Good Neighbor Agreement.

      http://www.windycitymediagroup.com/lgbt/Broadway-Youth-Center-wins-zoning-appeal/45918.html

      Delete
    2. Since bypassing SELVN, we have no real proof that any real document exists that is signed. Going to email for a signed copy and will report back.

      Delete
  2. that fight happened two blocks from the 800+ student nettelhorst school, at melrose and broadway, just before school let out. it's a kindergarten thru 8th grade school. Who knows? If these deserving, misunderstood youth had staged their brawl only a 2 minute walk north, they may have been tangling within the young kids and parents who leave at that time. maybe they'll do so next time, or the time after that. our current alderman, who likes misunderstood youth as long as they're not in his restaurants, and the totally benevolent people who understand everything better than you nimby's and happen to get paid to "counsel" these youth so they don't do things like brawl in the streets, seem sort of okay with whatever scenario plays out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That school is 3300 North and that fight was arond 3000 - light years away in urban terms - LOL.

      Delete
    2. Parents would be walking their children hope right past there. The school does not exist in a bubble.

      Delete
    3. i've lived in chicago for 40 years. 3 blocks isn't light years, and there's nothing LOL about any of this.

      Delete
  3. You think it's going to get better? It's not. These "youths" are constantly told they are being held "down" by the "man" instead of their own behaviors. We all read the letter from the ex-BYC director; we are all phobic this and phobic that and blah, blah and more blah. I dread this summer!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This may not get posted, but man, this is kind of an ignorant post. The crime problem starts with a lack of support and a "throw their hands up in the air because we don't even know where to start" government and societal approach to poor urban areas. Your "suck it up and change it yourselves" and perceived "woe is me" attitude about such people only contributes to people wanting to build a fence instead of help. I am not supporting the failure of the youth centers in Lakeview in not controlling their patrons, but come on.

      Delete
    2. so if i agree with your theory, and i do, that the core issues require a scale of effort beyond my personal ability (thought half my time is in volunteer work, to put things in context), do i just glumly accept that my family and i sort of deserve to get beat up on the streets? is the logic model that we allow felonious behavior, for decades, probably, until such time as all societal imbalances are righted? separately, the offenders in question, it seems, are indeed getting support - their center got its permit, services are underway - and one would expect that in the same way we measure the outcome of ANY effort, we would at least monitor a few things 1) are the services decreasing undesirable traits, and creating good ones 2) are the recipients of the service showing up for betterment, or because they can reverse the pecking order vix a vis their old neighborhoods 3) is there a positive or negative impact on the hosting community over the mid-term? I know this sort of angle doesn't sit well with some people because it can lead to uncomfortable answers, but just hosting a bunch of kids who aren't accountable to improving in some church every night doesn't make them or the neighborhood any better, unless the right programs are really sticking.

      Delete
  4. Unfortunately, it seems all we can do now is try to stay safe and to report and keep track of every incident involving BYC so we can presented it at their zoning re-approval hearing next year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Reporting and tracking incidents is an important step. Equally important is making efforts to work with the center as events happen. Document what does or does not happen after meeting with them as outlined in the Good Neighbor Agreement.

      Going in at some possible future hearing with a list of things that happened will be worthless if no attempt has been made to rectify the problems as they occur.

      We think the BYC experience has been a a wake-up call for the social service agencies. Now is the time to show the agencies that (1) they do bear some responsibility and (2) the neighborhood is willing to engage and give them a fair shake.

      Delete
  5. "In the meantime, the youth had called the police himself. "

    If the victim had not called police, would BYC staff have called police?

    ReplyDelete
  6. Does anybody work or go to school anymore?...I am 53, lost my career and work two "jobs", so spare me these dudes cant find work saga.....

    ReplyDelete
  7. Told ya you neighbors should post cameras within their property boundaries to record these incidents.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Right, security cameras in private property aiming at the BYC and the adjoining area would definitely put the BYC on the spot.

      Delete
    2. A 2012 article from a similar thing a citizens' group tried in DC. It met legal problems.

      http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2012/feb/5/surveillance-from-private-property-questioned/?page=all

      Delete
    3. Doesn't say anything about legal trouble. Some mucky mucks weren't happy, but nothing about legal trouble. As long as the camera is on your property and faves publicly accessible areas, you've got no problems. IE don't point the camera in your neighbors bedroom window.

      Delete
    4. Also read the article. Same. Not really legal issues. Just people saying things like" well if u install it for one thing it can be used for another..." Other than that...don't really see a problem.

      Delete
    5. Why does anyone think cameras will solve the problem? WHO will even watch the videos? There are not enough cops to patrol the streets...I don't want them watching videos. The state's attorney will not use them...she is worse than the criminals. The media won't use them...they will negatively portray minorities. The politicians will claim they were illegally obtained. So what good are videos????

      Delete
    6. the idea is that having video of people leaving the center and engaging in unneighborly behavior would counter the he-said-she-said is-your-client aint-our-client back and forth that gives everyone migraines. its not about recording the next crime of the century. its about documenting day to day operations to show what is really happening.

      Delete
    7. The camera is a brilliant idea! When the BYC finds out that the anonymity of their patients is compromised, they may actually reconsider and move out.

      Delete
  8. I completely agree. There was a woman who spoke at the last SELVN meeting who said she lived across the street. If anyone knows her, or knows anyone who lives across the street or close by, let's talk. If you email the folks at CWB, I think they could find a way to get your email to me.

    ReplyDelete