Tuesday, October 29, 2013

GREEDY DELIVERY: Worker's Phone Goes Bye-Bye At Halsted/Belmont

A delivery driver had her iPhone stolen at Belmont and Halsted at 2:30 this afternoon. After taking the woman's phone, the offender fled northbound on Dayton Street, the alley-like street that runs north from Belmont between Halsted and Clark.

The entrance to Dayton Street at Belmont Avenue. Image: Here.com
The thief is described as male, black, 5'10" tall, medium build, wearing a bright red track jacket.

After searching the area for the offender, an officer drove the victim to the Lincoln Park Apple Store to see if they could assist with tracking her phone. They had no success.

It is not clear if the woman filed a report.

Early Sunday morning, a man reported that his phone was stolen from the Subway restaurant at Belmont and Clark. That thief also escaped northbound on Dayton.

12 comments:

  1. Dayton seems to be the escape route of choice. Would love to see a booby trap set up there...one of those springloaded nets like in the old Tarzan movies, where if you step into it, it encircles you and raises you from the ground leaving you hanging there upside down and helpless.

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    1. We were reminded this evening of a CWB post from early May (we were so young back then!) Dayton runs behind the garage in the following story and provides access to the rear door.

      http://crimeinboystown.blogspot.com/2013/05/the-hangout-cops-eye-garage-in-robbery_7.html

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    2. Should really consider blocking off that ALLEY aka Dayton "street"

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  2. The cop drove her to the Apple store in LP as short staffed as they are?

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  3. Why would they allow him to drive her to store like he's a detective or something. He was a beat officer right????
    Dis his supervisor allow this??

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    Replies
    1. SMH. The cop was trying to locate the victim's phone through the Find My Phone GPS App hoping he/she could track the opportunist/predator, arrest him, and get him off your streets. And some of you have a problem with that? Unreal.

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  4. Imagine the insanity if Google Glasses becomes as popular as IPhones. You will have to secure the glasses to your head with heavy duty granny chains.

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  5. I agree, the officer did the right thing by trying to track down the thief. Each one that we can put resources on to catch makes a big difference. If the approach had yielded results and the thief caught, everyone would be singing praises right now. The dynamic of crime in the neighborhood needs to change. Each crook caught means one less on the street, and more importantly changing the criminals' belief that they can get away with crime in our neighborhood. Congatulations to the supervisor for his efforts.

    Next question to everyone. What apps can we download that will help us track our phones in the event of theft? I know it was mentioned before that someone had such an app and was able to track it down in one incident a while back, but I didn't see information on the name of the app. If we all had such an app on our phones, we could all help in turning things around.

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    Replies
    1. If you have an iPhone, it's already equipped with the Find My Phone function. You have to create a profile on the Apple site and activate the Find My Phone function. You can do the same for Mac's, iPads, etc.

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    2. "Where's My Droid" is worth checking out for Android users.

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  6. Apple has the built in app "find my phone" and does the I-Pad and possibly something similar on Mac laptops. It has to be turned on in the device settings. It only works if the phone is not powered down and on laptops there are a few software programs that can ping locations once connected to the internet. Some take a photo of the person and email it to the original owner.

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